STRL

Conference Venue

The conference takes place in the Bede Island Building of the De Montfort University which is located in Leicester, England.

Bede Island Building

The Bede Island Building is building 2 on the Campus map.

Venue contacts

  • Hongji Yang (Local organisation committee Chair, Treasurer)

Venue Background Information

De Montfort University (DMU) is a dynamic institution with a long and vibrant history of improving people's lives through education. Originally founded as Leicester School of Art in 1869, the university has evolved through many incarnations and is formed from a diverse range of specialist organisations. Named after Simon De Montfort, a crucial figure in medieval history who established the first parliament in 1265, DMU was awarded university status in 1992.

DMU's reputation for quality and distinctiveness in teaching and research is a direct result of its heritage. Many modern DMU courses have their roots in the late 19th century and early 20th century, when the school of art and Leicester School of Technology began providing training for local industries. Art, pharmacy, corsetry, footwear, physical sciences and architecture were taught at the schools in the late 1800s and are still in evidence at DMU today, either as courses in their own right, or as integral components of more modern courses. For example, chemistry is a vital part of our BSc Forensic Science degree.

In 1934, DMU's engineering teaching received a prestigious accolade when London University declared it as suitable for preparing students for an external degree in the subject. Today, many of our engineering courses are accredited by professional bodies. A commitment to ensuring teaching kept pace with the changing needs of businesses meant that computing courses were introduced in the 1960s; DMU's computing degrees are still highly valued by industry to this day.

The university has grown and evolved over the years, but it is still dedicated to providing inspirational teaching to students and it has a significant impact on the world around it: we contribute £389 million a year to the UK economy according to a recent report and our research is highly regarded.

Find more about DMU's history.


Jul 4 2012